Sunday, 19 October 2014

29 Let's Go

Like many on 'Planet Lard' I have bought a copy of the new Chain of Command supplement '29 Let's Go' this week. This is the first of Too Fat Lardies 'pint-sized' campaigns, so called because they are available for the princely sum £3.50, about the same as a pint of beer in a pub.

It depicts the advance by the US 29th Division just after D-day to take Isigny-sur-mer and allow a link up between the Omaha & Utah sectors. There are five scenario in all depicting historical encounters on 8th June.

I didn't buy this because I hope to play the campaign. As you will know if you've read some of my earlier posts my main interest in Chain of Command is VBCW, (which I am still working on btw). Indeed I don't run WWII games; if I did I would probably favour Operation Seelowe or maybe the Western Desert. All-in-all it's unlikely I will get into gaming Normandy.

So why did I buy it? Well it's for the historical interest. I visited Normandy on holiday earlier this year, so I was interested mainly to see where the games would be set & find out more. I am not disappointed. As is usual for Richard Clarke's work the depth of historical understanding is very impressive and its very clear that he has really done his research. There is a extended historical background section and it gave me several insights into the Omaha sector of the campaign that had escaped me until now; not least why the allies felt they had no choice but to land there (I may well be ignorant, I know...). So I would really recommend it just for that.

As for the games themselves, I will not say too much. They are of course, not balanced. The Americans, with many more assets have a fresh platoon for each game and plenty of Sherman tanks, whereas the Germans have to try desperately to make their resources last. You really get a feel for how thinly the Germans were stretched. On the other hand the Germans have only to slow down the yanks to 'win' the campaign on the basis that will allow their troops to escape to the other side of the Aure river (thereby preventing a link up to Utah).

All in all its fascinating stuff and excellent value too.